Anchor Event Final 050917 (2)

The Dallas Beacon – June, 2012

Masjid Al Islam’s Monthly Communication Wire June 2012

Advertise with us, call: (214) 205-0846, visit: www.masjidalislam.org for more info.

THANK YOU TO EVERYONE WHO HELPED MAKE HUMANITARIAN DAY 2012 A BIG SUCCESS!

SPECIAL THANKS TO ALL OF OUR SPONSORS:

Masjid Al-Islam
Texas Muslim Women’s Foundation (TMWF)
Islamic Association of Collin County
Islamic Circle of North America (ICNA)
Mass Discount Merchandizer
King Import Warehouse
Colleyville Masjid
Islamic Center of Irving
East Plano Islamic Center (EPIC)
Islamic Association of North Texas (IANT)
Islamic Relief USA

Current News!!
Community Social held the last Sunday of every month at Masjid AL-Islam, 2604 S Harwood, Dallas, TX @1:30p.m.

Come out to socialize with members of our Islamic community and have some wholesome fun! Do we really need another reason to get together!?!?!

·Board Games for children and adults (including Islamic ones)
·Wii Video Games, blocks and puzzles for the youth
·NBA playoff game for Adults.
..Please bring a dish. ** Contact Sis. Sameerah (312-933-2648).

SUMMER CAMP AT MASJID AL-ISLAM, 2604 S. HARWOOD, DALLAS, TX JUNE 4 – 22 (MAYBE 29TH). CONTACT SIS. TWYLA ABDULLAH AT (972) 966-9226 FOR INFORMATION AND TO COMPLETE AN INTEREST FORM.

Imam W. Deen Mohammed Appreciation Weekend was held June 8th Thru 10th, 2012 Dallas, Texas.

Masjid Al-Quran hosted “Imam W. Deen Mohammed Appreciation Weekend” honoring the Imam’s thirty-three years of leadership in the Muslim Community and his vision for the future. The Historic Event included speakers and workshop presenters Imam Qasim Ahmed, Dr. Muzammil Siddiqi, Imam Yahya Abdullah, Sister Khadijah Siddeeq (Mohammed), Sister Evelyn Akram, Imam Khalid Shaheed, Imam Mohammed Siddeeq, Dr. Yusuf Kavakci and other guests.

All Proceeds Go Toward Expansion of Masjid Al-Quran.

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Save the Date!!!

Interfaith Conference, Saturday, June 16, 2012….10:00 am – 12:30 pm Meeting, Lunch 12:30 – 1:30 pm. Imam Khalid Shaheed, Guest Speaker. LOCATION: THE GRAND HOTEL, 7815 Lyndon B. Johnson Frwy (IH-635), Dallas, Texas 75251, Ph: 469-206-3190

THE BROOKS OF BAZIGA GRADUATE PROGRAM WILL BE HELD SUNDAY, JUNE 24, 2012 @ 1:30 P.M. AT MASJID AL-ISLAM. BELOW IS A LIST OF GRADUATES WHO WILL RECEIVE AN AWARD FROM THE BROOKS OF BAZIGA FOUNDER, SISTER RUBY B. MUHAMMAD:

Amanee Agdal’ Razzaq El

Andrea Abdullah

Nia Muhammad

Maya Matthews

K’ Shanunti Oranges

Lugman Rashadah

Nia Iman Richard

Chiamaka Williams

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Free Legal Clinic at Masjid Al-Islam

Saturday, June 30, 2012
11:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
2604 S Harwood St – Dallas, TX 75215
———————————————————————————–

You can become a member online at: http://masjidalislam.org/member.html

The Dallas Beacon Sponsors:

Dr. K’s Windshield Repair
*Let us take care of your Windshield Repair
and Replacement.”
*Most Repairs are FREE.
*We repair Rockchips and
Cracks up to 15 inches
Call 972-274-4000

V F AUTO
4605 Village Fair
Dallas, TX. 75224
CASH CARS
Contact: Ahmad Pitre
214. 502.9245
214. 317.8282

Advertise with us, call: (214) 205-0846, visit: www.masjidalislam.org for more info.

Disclaimer: The views presented in the articles of this newsletter do not represent the views of Masjid Al Islam

By: Yusuf Abdullah
THE RIGHT AND WRONG OF IT

There are demographic studies which reflect that by year 2040, America will be a majority minority nation. Recently, a demographic study came out that showed that one out of every two new births in America last year was a minority birth of African-American, Latino, or Asian origin. America is changing its color and its changing quickly. Change of color or ethnicity also means cultural diversity. The day of either Black or White is no more and many of the long held beliefs and attitudes about minority and majority groups are also long gone. America’s youth now do not hold or believe many of the long held beliefs or value system of their parents or grandparents. Negative stereotypes of cultures are now being readily dismissed as falsehoods and politically unacceptable. Why? Neighborhoods, and classrooms and the workplace now include women, and men of all colors and ethnicities. In addition, television and movies are now more inclusive of people of color on screen and in their storylines. Further, a large number of American cities now have African-American mayors, state senators, US house representatives and of course, we now have our first African-American US President born of interracial parentage. Pop music and Hip-Hop music dominated by African-American youth lead America’s youth in the art of music, dance, and fashion. Pop singer Beyonce’ was recently named one of the most beautiful women in the world. There was a time in America when a person of color could never have been seen and recognized as beautiful. Also, when you have 1 out of 2 births in America being a minority, interracial dating and marriage will likely increase among all groups. In other words, we are moving into a time when it will not be uncommon to see people of color in positions of power, leadership, and wealth. The power of the ballot box in our democratic system of government can no longer afford to overlook the majority of its citizens of color. Latinos are a major force to be reckoned with today as the fastest growing minority group in America. Asian Americans are consistently increasing their numbers and wealth in America. Collectively, African-Americans, Latinos, and Asians are a powerhouse group in numbers and wealth that could dominate and control our labor force and democratic system of government for centuries. But, it is never that easy because the devil is in the details. Democracy becomes impotent without educated registered voters that vote. Effective democracy is an active democracy. You must be involved and aware of the political issues that affect your life at the local, state, and federal level. Divide and conquer still works as a classic stratagem of war and politics. Bribery and Corruptive practices such as the attempt to sell the vacant senate seat of then Senator Barack Obama in Chicago is an example of what must be guarded against in order to insure that our vote is not diluted or taken away altogether. Recent news reported that in numerous states there is an all out effort to legislatively either prohibit voters from registering to vote and/or intimidate registered voters from voting by having them dropped from the registered rolls of voters. Freedom has never been free and power has never conceded its position without a vigilant and opposing force making a demand. Be vigilant. The time is now. If we want change, we must demand change and stay the course until it is changed. Until next time, that’s the right and wrong of it.

By: Khalid Shaheed
As salaamu alaikum (may peace be upon you),

According to the Seerah of Rasululah, SAWS, when he encountered the angel Jibreel, A.S, he came down from Mount Hira shaken. He asked his wife Khadijah,R.A. to cover him. After he regained his composure he began to recount to his wife what he had experienced. He expressed some personal concerns. Khadijah, R.A. immediately told him, you maintain relationship ties, you bear the burdens of others, you care for the poor, you care for the needy, you maintain truthfulness. Allah will not allow disgrace to befall you. These are descriptions of his character as seen by his wife and no one knows us better than our spouse in most cases. This was his basic character.

The question I want to pose is, did his basic character ever change? He had great success towards the end of his life. A few examples are, he left Mecca fleeing with one companion, Abu Bakr, R.A. but he returned with over 100,000 for his farewell pilgrimage. He left with one companion but returned with 10,000 when Mecca surrendered to him and after Hunayn he had thousands of pounds of silver and great wealth that he gave all away to others.

The point is that his basic character never changed. After Mecca surrender, he returned with his head bowed on his camel and forgave the people. At his farewell hajj he talked about treating your spouse fairly and equity among mankind. After Hunayn he demonstrated great generosity. Nothing changed his character.

With this said, it is imperative to state and understand that one of his greatest and lasting legacies is that of MORAL COURAGE. Moral courage has been defined as having principles that you live by that are unchangeable. This is so needed in the world of increasing imbalance in every sector of society and with individuals.

As Muslims, we are to see that there is evil in the world that is contrary to good and we are to have the moral courage to stand with the good and the confidence that good will be triumphant, regardless of how popular or big evil gets. This is rooted in Islam and our Prophet, SAWS.

gratefully,

Khalid Shaheed

UWM Views
By Amir Makin

Violating the Sunnah: A Necessary Ritual

The following story could take place anywhere. I recently took a brief vacation to a distant city and decided to attend the Friday prayer service. I noticed the masjid was constructed from the ground up. It was comfortable, elegant and beautiful, but not extravagant. As I arrived early, my son and I marveled at the immaculate nature of the carpet and the sweet smells emanating from the masala. As I waited for the call to prayer I noticed some brothers who came in dressed as if they had been in a desert sandstorm. I also observed another man who was not dressed in similar fashion but was clearly not familiar with the protocol of the Friday prayer or the masjid (i.e what time do we start, how he could access Islamic literature, when certain questions could be asked). He approached the aforementioned brothers with his questions, and after looking him up and down as if to inspect his dress, they began to verbally accost him for being “in violation of the Sunnah.”

The brothers explained that nothing could be done for him nor could they speak to him as long as he remained in this state of violation. The man, clearly put off by this treatment turns to exit the masjid. Before he could leave I approached him, introduced myself, let him know I like him was a visitor and would try to answer whatever questions I could. He asked me about the “violation of the sunnah” charge. I explained to him the sunnah was the way of practicing Allah’s law that all prophets exemplified, and that it covered everything from how to extend kindness to raising children, and much else. I also explained that Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) once stated that he had been sent to teach good manners, but that aspect of his example has not been properly understood by all.

The man, who I learned after speaking with him had been Muslim less than 1 week. This was the first masjid he chose to attend the Friday prayer, and he was ready to miss it due to some immature and disrespectful people. The man agreed to come back in and attend the khutbah (sermon) and congregational prayer. Afterwards we both approached the khateeb (speaker) where he was treated with good manners, and all of his questions and concerns were kindly and fully addressed.

It never ceases to disgust me at how some are satisfied to place ritual commitment above the spiritual reality the Qur’an and example of Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) actually call for. The spiritual side of Al Islam is to increase ones’ taqwa (consciousness of staying obedient to Allah) is something that can not be measured by others because it begins in the heart which only Allah can see and radiates outward in complementary behavior. The ritual side begins and ends in one’s external behavior (style of dress, imitation of others) for the express purpose of being seen in order to gain group acceptance by those who established the group standards. We must not forget that our entry into the Paradise depends on us obeying the command to enjoin right and forbid wrong according to the standard set by Allah, and not the standard of any group. It is never justified to violate the sunnah of good manners in order to advocate group conformity. Sincere spirituality does not yield to ritual behavior.

Amir Makin is an analyst and author of A Worthy Muslim. He frequently writes on issues concerning Al Islam, race and society. His work can be found here: http://unworthymuslim.com

Donate to the Beacon of Light Project

Masjid Al Islam is embarking on an important project for the south Dallas area. The neighborhood around Masjid Al Islam is in dire need of community development. The Beacon of Light Community Center project is a major step in addressing this issue. Also, because of the growing numbers of recipients every year at the Day of Dignity and Humanitarian Day events, The Beacon of Light Center will be critical in providing a larger platform to host these events. In additions to the Day of Dignity and Humanitarian Day, the Beacon of Light Center will house other services such as; Food Pantry, Social Services, Job Training, Substance Abuse Counseling, Youth Activities and Medical Screenings. Make a pledge by filling a pledge card or going to www.masjidalislam.org to support this project.

Masjid Al Islam Recurring Activities
All activities and classes are open to anybody who’s interested, call the numbers below for more information about the activity/class.

Community Meeting (Anyone/everyone invited)
Every other 3rd Sunday of month 1:30 pm- 3:30 pm
214-502-0815

Feeding our neighbors
Every Saturday and Sunday of the month, volunteers arrive at 9:00 am
214-527-6074

Sisters Halaqa
Every 3rd Saturday 11:30 pm – 1:30 pm
214-923-3641

Men’s Halaqa
Sunday’s 6:00 am after Fajr prayer
469-766-2208

Fiqh of Islam
Sunday’s 1:30 – 3pm
469-766-2208

Childrens Arabic and Islamic studies (ages 6-15)
Saturdays 11am – 1pm
469-766-2208

Childrens Arabic and islamic studies (ages 4-7)
Sundays 11am – 1pm
469-766-2208

Childrens Arabic (ages 8-14)
Sundays 11am – 12pm
469-766-2208

Childrens Islamic studies (ages 8-14)
Sundays 12pm – 1pm
469-766-2208

Introduction to Islam Classes (open to anyone wanting to learn basics about islam)
Sundays 11am – 1pm
214-660-6153

Adult Arabic Class
Wednesdays 7 – 8:15pm
469-766-2208

Masjid Al Islam is a registered 501C3 Organization. For more information on Masjid Al Islam, please visit www.masjidalislam.org

2604 S. Harwood St.
Dallas, TX 75215
(214) 421-3839

Anchor Event Final 050917 (2)

The Dallas Beacon – February / March 2012

Masjid Al Islam’s Monthly Communication Wire February / March 2012

Advertise with us, call: (214) 205-0846, visit: www.masjidalislam.org for more info.

Current News!!
Save the Date!!!, May 19th is Humanitarian Day. Our first planning meeting is this Sunday!! Hope to see you there.

Humanitarian Day Planning Meeting

Location: Masjid Al – Islam, 2604 S. Harwood Dallas, TX 75215.

Time: 11:00 A. M – 12:00 noon

Date: Sunday – April 1, 2012

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Today !!, Rashad Hussain will be present at Collin County Community College for panel discussion on Islam in America, politics, and much more. In January 2009, Hussain was named deputy associate counsel to President Barack Obama. Hussain, a Muslim of Indian heritage, raised in Plano, Texas, has served in the White House Counsel’s Office, and in his role as Envoy, has advised the Administration on policy issues related to the Muslim world.

Panel Discussion starts at 6pm and is in Room C103

Address: 2800 East Spring Creek Parkway Plano, TX 75074

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This Friday!!, Qasim Bashir will be present at Collin County Community College for a live screening of the movie he directed, Mooslum; and there will be a Q&A session afterward discussing the movie and his future works. This event starts at 6pm in room C103 and is free to the public. The address is: 2800 East Spring Creek Parkway Plano, TX 75074

You can become a member online at: http://masjidalislam.org/member.html

The Dallas Beacon Sponsors:

Dr. K’s Windshield Repair
*Let us take care of your Windshield Repair
and Replacement.”
*Most Repairs are FREE.
*We repair Rockchips and
Cracks up to 15 inches
Call 972-274-4000

V F AUTO
4605 Village Fair
Dallas, TX. 75224
CASH CARS
Contact: Ahmad Pitre
214. 502.9245
214. 317.8282

Advertise with us, call: (214) 205-0846, visit: www.masjidalislam.org for more info.

Disclaimer: The views presented in the articles of this newsletter do not represent the views of Masjid Al Islam

By: Yusuf Abdullah
It’s Black History Month in February. The shortest month in the calendar year is February. Ask yourself, its Black History month, how much have I learned this month about Black History? I remember in younger years when Black History Month meant that the television movie Roots would be certainly be shown on television along with other movies like Sounder, and the Autobiography of Ms. Jane Pittman featuring Cisely Tyson. No one could look and sound like an old black worn out slave like Cicely Tyson. Well it appears that those days are long gone. BET has been sold to Caucasian interest, and I see very little footage of Black history being shown on cable television. Even on Black radio, have you heard infomercials educating its listeners on Black history during Black history month? I haven’t. Do we really need a Black history month? I certainly think so. I think Black history month is necessary because Black people and their contributions to the United States and its independence, wealth, and culture have for far too long been written out of its history or minimized. The image of Black people in America for far too many people, including Black people remains a stereotyped negative image. Black people are typically typecast with crime, violence, drugs, non-productivity, and any uncivilized or immoral behavior. And while it is true that those types of people exist within Black society, the same characteristic exists within all races so why is it that this negative image is so pervasive among others for Black people? It has been joked that when a Black man robs you, he gets just what is in your pocketbook, but when a White man robs you, he robs you not only of your pocketbook, but your future, and dreams. It’s a joke, but I can see a contrast of truth in the joke. A typical street robbery carried out by a Black robber renders at best a small amount of money, even if it be a home or convenience store. But there is another crime called “White-Collar Crime” and those robberies renders millions and billions in theft. The so-called white-collar criminal is stereotypically non-black, well educated, and sophisticated, i.e. Bernie Madoff. However, Bernie Madoff and his peers who include Wall Street executives who collectively through the chicanery like cooking the books, insider trading, offshore investments, golden parachutes, influence peddling, political lobbyist, SuperPacs, and manipulation of the tax code, drove this country to bankruptcy. However, you don’t see the $5,000 suit and briefcase executive as a thief like you see the pants hanging off his behind, tennis shoe wearing black kid on the street. Has there even been an arrest of those responsible for Wall Street crimes? No, the image of a Harvard graduate being a thief is not the same image as a high school dropout. There is also a big difference in the image of Black and White that remains in America. Blacks and people of color are not yet equal and certainly not viewed or treated as equal in all aspects of society. But let me emphasize again, Black people and people of color are far too often themselves victims of ignorance of the greatness of themselves. This is understandable. When schools, television, books, radio, etc. reflect images and stories produced mostly by one group in a society and are controlled by mostly one group in America, you will get a history or an image that is told only through the eyes of that controlling group. I say produce a balanced portrait of any people in history. All Whites are/were not racist, or slave owners. All Blacks or people of color are not lazy, and no good. All Whites are not good people, and of good moral character. All Blacks are not singers and dancers and rappers, and criminals. We need Black history month to show the positive contributions and the diversity and richness of Black people and their culture. We need a balanced perspective to counteract the false stereotypes of Black people and people of color. However, to simply have a Black History Month that does not educate is an impotent event. Showing a movie during Black History Month like Shaft, or Superfly is not education. Telling the world that it was a Black man who successfully performed the first open heart surgery is. Do you know the contributions of Daniel Hale Williams, Lewis Lattimer, Madam C.J. Walker, Mark Dean, or Patricia Bath? This is proof then of why we need Black History Month in America. Click this link and read just some of the notable Black contributions to this great nation called America. http://www.infoplease.com/spot/bhmscientists1.html Until next time, that’s the right and wrong of it.

By: Khalid Shaheed
As salaamu alaikum (may peace be upon you),

It is debatable when the practice of Islamic monotheism first appeared here in North America. However, most historians agree that it was either in the 1500s or 1600s. What is truly amazing irony is that something as superior as Islamic monotheism, the worship of only One God came to these shores in what appears to be in an inferior way. These Muslims were brought here in bondage and struggled to maintain their practices, their knowledge of Quran and Quranic Arabic.

Dr. Allan Austin writes in his book “African Muslims in Antebellum America” on page 11 in a discussion about many of the African slaves whose names have survived the turmoil of slave history, “It may be argued that these people were elite Africans” and also “they were trained well in the tenets of their faith.” Some of the names that history has preserved are Job Ben Solomon, Abd ar Rahman, Bilali Mohammed, Salih Bilali, Umar ibn Said, Mahommah Gardo Baquaqua, Abu Bakr, Old Lizzy Gray, William Rainford, Charles Larren, Fatema(Phoebe), Cochrane. The list goes on.

Dr. Sylviane Diouf says that the first public group prayers in United States was established in 1830s on Sea Island, Georgia. These prayers were recorded by some of their slave masters who witnessed these events. First Qurans written in America were written from memory by slaves like Charles Larren, Job Ben Solomon and others. Long passages and manuscripts of the Quran and Arabic were written by many slaves and they still exist today.

All of these events took place before the Civil War in what is called Ante Bellum America. This legacy was continued after the Civil War. In 1913 a man from South Carolina name Timothy Drew founded the Moorish Science Temples of America. He talked about the Quran and Allah and then came the modern day presence of Islam in the U.S.

All Muslims in America should know this great American Islamic legacy that exist. This history belongs to all of us. It should be taught in Muslim Schools, so Muslims can have a sense of belonging here. Also, non-Muslims need to know that Islam and the Muslim presence permeate American history.

UWM Views

By Amir Makin

Violating the Sunnah: A Necessary Ritual

The following story could take place anywhere. I recently took a brief vacation to a distant city and decided to attend the Friday prayer service. I noticed the masjid was constructed from the ground up. It was comfortable, elegant and beautiful, but not extravagant. As I arrived early, my son and I marveled at the immaculate nature of the carpet and the sweet smells emanating from the masala. As I waited for the call to prayer I noticed some brothers who came in dressed as if they had been in a desert sandstorm. I also observed another man who was not dressed in similar fashion but was clearly not familiar with the protocol of the Friday prayer or the masjid (i.e what time do we start, how he could access Islamic literature, when certain questions could be asked). He approached the aforementioned brothers with his questions, and after looking him up and down as if to inspect his dress, they began to verbally accost him for being “in violation of the Sunnah.”

The brothers explained that nothing could be done for him nor could they speak to him as long as he remained in this state of violation. The man, clearly put off by this treatment turns to exit the masjid. Before he could leave I approached him, introduced myself, let him know I like him was a visitor and would try to answer whatever questions I could. He asked me about the “violation of the sunnah” charge. I explained to him the sunnah was the way of practicing Allah’s law that all prophets exemplified, and that it covered everything from how to extend kindness to raising children, and much else. I also explained that Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) once stated that he had been sent to teach good manners, but that aspect of his example has not been properly understood by all.

The man, who I learned after speaking with him had been Muslim less than 1 week. This was the first masjid he chose to attend the Friday prayer, and he was ready to miss it due to some immature and disrespectful people. The man agreed to come back in and attend the khutbah (sermon) and congregational prayer. Afterwards we both approached the khateeb (speaker) where he was treated with good manners, and all of his questions and concerns were kindly and fully addressed.

It never ceases to disgust me at how some are satisfied to place ritual commitment above the spiritual reality the Qur’an and example of Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) actually call for. The spiritual side of Al Islam is to increase ones’ taqwa (consciousness of staying obedient to Allah) is something that can not be measured by others because it begins in the heart which only Allah can see and radiates outward in complementary behavior. The ritual side begins and ends in one’s external behavior (style of dress, imitation of others) for the express purpose of being seen in order to gain group acceptance by those who established the group standards. We must not forget that our entry into the Paradise depends on us obeying the command to enjoin right and forbid wrong according to the standard set by Allah, and not the standard of any group. It is never justified to violate the sunnah of good manners in order to advocate group conformity. Sincere spirituality does not yield to ritual behavior.

Amir Makin is an analyst and author of A Worthy Muslim. He frequently writes on issues concerning Al Islam, race and society. His work can be found here: http://unworthymuslim.com

Donate to the Beacon of Light Project

Masjid Al Islam is embarking on an important project for the south Dallas area. The neighborhood around Masjid Al Islam is in dire need of community development. The Beacon of Light Community Center project is a major step in addressing this issue. Also, because of the growing numbers of recipients every year at the Day of Dignity and Humanitarian Day events, The Beacon of Light Center will be critical in providing a larger platform to host these events. In additions to the Day of Dignity and Humanitarian Day, the Beacon of Light Center will house other services such as; Food Pantry, Social Services, Job Training, Substance Abuse Counseling, Youth Activities and Medical Screenings. Make a pledge by filling a pledge card or going to www.masjidalislam.org to support this project.

Masjid Al Islam Recurring Activities
All activities and classes are open to anybody who’s interested, call the numbers below for more information about the activity/class.

Community Meeting (Anyone/everyone invited)
Every other 3rd Sunday of month 1:30 pm- 3:30 pm
214-502-0815

Feeding our neighbors
Every Saturday and Sunday of the month, volunteers arrive at 9:00 am
214-527-6074

Sisters Halaqa
Every 3rd Saturday 11:30 pm – 1:30 pm
214-923-3641

Men’s Halaqa
Sunday’s 6:00 am after Fajr prayer
469-766-2208

Fiqh of Islam
Sunday’s 1:30 – 3pm
469-766-2208

Childrens Arabic and Islamic studies (ages 6-15)
Saturdays 11am – 1pm
469-766-2208

Childrens Arabic and islamic studies (ages 4-7)
Sundays 11am – 1pm
469-766-2208

Childrens Arabic (ages 8-14)
Sundays 11am – 12pm
469-766-2208

Childrens Islamic studies (ages 8-14)
Sundays 12pm – 1pm
469-766-2208

Introduction to Islam Classes (open to anyone wanting to learn basics about islam)
Sundays 11am – 1pm
214-660-6153

Adult Arabic Class
Wednesdays 7 – 8:15pm
469-766-2208

Masjid Al Islam is a registered 501C3 Organization. For more information on Masjid Al Islam, please visit www.masjidalislam.org

2604 S. Harwood St.
Dallas, TX 75215
(214) 421-3839